Should I Tell My Lawyer Everything Related To My Charges?

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When it comes to hiring an attorney, you may wonder what exactly you should tell your representation. It is important to remember the attorney-client privilege in place. This prevents the attorney from going out and telling anyone else what you told him or her in confidence. Additionally, the lawyer may not be questioned about you in regards to the case (otherwise prosecuting attorneys would simply call the defense attorney to the stand). With all of this in mind, you may wonder whether or not you should tell your lawyer everything related to your charges. Here are a few tips.

Truth, If Not The Whole Truth

Whether an attorney wants all the details or wants you to exercise your right to remain silent, they absolutely want you to tell the truth. Defense lawyers are prohibited from presenting false evidence. That includes allowing you to commit perjury on the stand.

“Tell Me What Happened”

An attorney will tell you what they want to know. This can go on a case by case basis, but more often than not your attorney will what to hear, from your point of view, exactly what happened. This will help them shape an argument that is most likely to result in a not guilty verdict; or, if you are pleading guilty, it can help them negotiate down the charges.

Effective representation often rests on knowing details, which is why the prosecution has to disclose information to the defense that could help the defendant’s case. For instance, if the police report says a witness did not see the suspect’s face, and you were then identified in a line-up, your defense attorney needs to know that and the prosecution is legally obligated to inform them.

“I’m Going to Stop You Right There”

Some attorneys prefer knowing the bare minimum. They build cases based on the prosecution’s discovery, which consists of information that can help your case as well as the information used to prosecute you. Narrowing the scope of the case in this way can avoid complications.

Either way, your attorney needs to treat you like a human being, not a body moving through the system. For compassionate representation, look no further than the team at Pinnacle Law.

 

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